Friday, December 19, 2014

A Book (Every Other) Day ... Day 19 and Waiting for Snow in Havana

A good friend of mine lent me this book a couple of years ago ... and I think it's super appropriate to recommend it today! And now I want to re-read it because I read it with "baby brain." (My second daughter was a newborn.)
Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy by Pedro Eire is a what feels like a fairytale, this-can't-be-for-real memoir (see ... I'm telling you, this is the year of the memoir for me) of a young boy who lived a life of Cuban aristocracy (with a father who was a judge who believed himself to be the reincarnation of Louis XVI),  the depression and fear he lived in post-revolution, then leaving Cuba in Operation Pedro Pan -- an operation that flew thousands of Cuban children out of Cuba without their parents and plopped them in Miami. These children became "lost boys."
What makes the memoir so poignant is Eire's incredible voice that's both nostalgic and indicting ... a powerful way to view the world and take a scalpal to his memories to extract vignettes of beauty and tragedy and bring us along this journey he lived.

Today, I celebrate the walls that are crumbling away to creating a more hospitable, decent world.
Today, I celebrate Waiting for Snow in Havana




Wednesday, December 17, 2014

A Book a Day ... Day 17 and A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius

I've noticed that I'm on a bit of a memoir kick. It's completely unintentional, really, since my Mom is a binge reader and hands me everything she reads. This year, apparently, was my mom's "the year of memoir."

A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers is a hyperactive, Red Bull memoir that is a bit dizzying. Eggers is self deprecating, egocentric college senior who loses both his parents to cancer within a period of five weeks and becomes his 8-year-old brother's guardian. Between turning a hard-wood floored home into a sliding rink and juggling work, school, his 8-year-old brother's life and and the hormones of a 22-year-old, this memoir is a bit like reading a stream-of-consciousness stumble through life.

It's good. It's inventive. It's a kind of writing I've never actually encountered before. And BOY was I glad to finish it because I was exhausted. It was like wind sprinting through this guy's mind ... and always being a step behind.


Eggers founded  826 , a non-profit organization that pairs students with writers to help students develop their writing ability and succeed in school. He's a really fascinating person.


Share it